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The Last Stand of the Gorilla - Environmental Crime and Conflict in the Congo Basin

Additional downloads:

PDF format Flyer [eng] (8 mb)
PDF format Flyer [fr] (16 mb)
PDF format Rollup (14 mb)
PDF format Poster 1 (15 mb)
PDF format Poster 2 (15 mb)
PDF format Poster 3 (8 mb)

PDF format Press release (Mar 24 2010)

Further resources

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)

UNEP: International Year of Biodiversity

Great Ape Survival Partnership (GRASP)


The report ‘The Last Stand of the Gorilla – Environmental Crime and Conflict in the Congo Basin’ was financed by the Government of France and the Great Ape Survival Parterships (GRASP) established by UNEP and UNESCO.

Gorillas, the largest of the great apes, are under renewed threat across the Congo Basin from Nigeria to the Albertine Rift: poaching for bushmeat, loss of habitat due to agricultural expansion, degradation of habitat from logging, mining and charcoal production are amongst these threats, in addition to natural epidemics such as ebola and the new risk of diseases passed from humans to gorillas.

Interactive E-book | Graphics from the report | PDF format Full report (6mb) | French (6.7mb)

Alarmingly, parts of the region are experiencing intensifed exploitation and logging of its forest, in some cases even within protected areas. In the DRC, many of these activities are controlled by militias illegally extracting natural resources such as gold, tin and coltan as well as producing charcoal for local communities, urban areas, camps for people displaced by fghting and sometimes even to communities across the border. These militias are located, motivated, armed and fnanced directly by this illegal extraction of minerals, timber and charcoal. A network of intermediaries including multinational companies or their subsidiaries, neighboring countries and corrupt offcials, are involved in the transportation and procurement of resources which stem from areas controlled by militia, or for which no legal exploitation permission exists.

Comments/Feedback

Jake Phillip - 07 Feb 2012
Very good.
TRUTH TEELER - 08 Sep 2012
HOW ABSOLUTLY DREADFUL LOOK AT US AND WHAT OUR SPECIES HAS BECOME.WHAT HAPPENED TO THE TIME WHEN MEN WERE OUT HUNTING WHEN CHILDREN FILLED THE STREETS WITH LAUGHTER AND ACTUALLY ENJOYED SCHOOL? WHEN WOMAN USED TO GO TO WORK OUT ON THE FOREST TO COLLECT BERIES? evolution happened....AND FOR WHAT?!? FOR US TO BECOME LAZY BUMBS WHO ROAM THE STREETS NOT KNOWING ANY LITERATURE OR A SIMPLE MATHAMATICAL TERM?!? WE NEED TO CHANGE OUR WAYS WE OR WE WILL CORUPT OURSELF WITH ELECTRONIS
Kim Geurts - 01 Apr 2013
Why are you saying that "hunting" was ok in bygone days, but not ok today?
Its exactly the same action!

Hunting is wrong for any reason.

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