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Climate feedbacks - the connectivity of the positive ice/snow albedo feedback, terrestrial snow and vegetation feedbacks and the negative cloud/radiation feedback Climate feedbacks - the connectivity of the positive ice/snow albedo feedback, terrestrial snow and vegetation feedbacks and the negative cloud/radiation feedback
Feedback refers to the modification of a process by changes resulting from the process itself. Positive feedbacks accelerate the process, while negative feedbacks slow it down. Part of the uncertainty around future climates relates to important feedbacks between different parts of the climate system: air temperatures, ice and snow albedo (reflection of the sun’s rays), and clouds. An important positive feedback is the ice and snow albedo feedback...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Increases in annual temperatures for a recent five-year period, relative to 1951-1980 Increases in annual temperatures for a recent five-year period, relative to 1951-1980
Warming is widespread, generally greater over land than over oceans, and the largest gains in temperatures for the planet are over the North American Arctic, north central Siberia, and on the Antarctic Peninsula. These recent increases in temperature are confirmed by changes in other features: loss of sea ice, shift of tundra to shrub vegetation, and migration of marine and terrestrial ecosystems to higher latitudes.
18 Apr 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Protected areas the Barents Region Protected areas the Barents Region
There are pristine wilderness and unspoiled field and tundra landscapes, and the air and water in most parts of the Region is mainly clean. Several areas are protected for scientific research, park areas, and nature reserves and several more are being proposed as protected areas.
14 Sep 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Major global bird migration routes to the Arctic Major global bird migration routes to the Arctic
Bird species that migrate to the Arctic coasts and wetlands arrive from nearly every corner of the planet. During the summer, the sun never or nearly never sets, resulting in a short but intensive breeding season when millions of migratory birds arrive in the Arctic to breed. The majority of these birds seek the wetlands and coastal shores of the tundra plains. No other place on Earth receives so many migratory species from nearly all corners of...
17 May 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map) Arctic, topography and bathymetry (topographic map)
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga).
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
(See http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/arctic-topography-and-bathymetry1 for an updated version of this map) The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Tai...
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Landcover - Europe and Central Asia Landcover - Europe and Central Asia
The Western part of the Eurasian continent, has some of the most populated and fertile parts of the World. Central Europe is densely populated, with few remaining fragments of undisturbed habitat, except for the mountain ranges. In the north - Scandinavia and Northern Russia, there is the taiga belt, with vast expanses of confierous forest, and further north, there is tundra and glaciers. Central Asia and Caucasus is a diverse region, with desert...
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga).
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga).
01 Jul 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Landcover - Europe and Central Asia Landcover - Europe and Central Asia
The Western part of the Eurasian continent, has some of the most populated and fertile parts of the World. Central Europe is densely populated, with few remaining fragments of undisturbed habitat, except for the mountain ranges. In the north - Scandinavia and Northern Russia, there is the taiga belt, with vast expanses of confierous forest, and further north, there is tundra and glaciers. Central Asia and Caucasus is a diverse region, with desert...
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Arctic, topography and bathymetry Arctic, topography and bathymetry
(See http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/arctic-topography-and-bathymetry1 for an updated version of this map) The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Tai...
18 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Nenets Autonomous Okrug, reference map Nenets Autonomous Okrug, reference map
Nenets Autonomous Okrug is an administrative region in Arctic Northwest Russia, covering some 176000 sq km of tundra and marshland. The capital city of the region is Narian-Mar. Off the coast are parts of the Arctic ocean know as Barents and Kara seas, and the long island in the north west is Novaya Zemlya.
17 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Nenets Autonomous Okrug, reference map Nenets Autonomous Okrug, reference map
Nenets Autonomous Okrug is an administrative region in Arctic Northwest Russia, covering some 176000 sq km of tundra and marshland. The capital city of the region is Narian-Mar. Off the coast are parts of the Arctic ocean know as Barents and Kara seas, and the long island in the north west is Novaya Zemlya.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Arctic map, political Arctic map, political
The Arctic is extremely diverse in terms of landscapes, varying from pack and drift ice to rugged shores, flat coastal plains, rolling hills and mountains surpassing 6000 metres above sea level (Denali, 6,194 m asl, in sub-arctic and boreal Alaska). The region has rivers and lakes, tundra and the largest forests in the world (the Russian Taiga). This is a simple grayscale political map.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Human impact: Barents region 2002 Human impact: Barents region 2002
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Human impact: Barents region 2032 (sustainability first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (sustainability first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'sustainability first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Human impact on the Arctic environment 2002 Human impact on the Arctic environment 2002
Human activities influence the environment and reduce the value of forests, tundra and plains in terms of original biodiversity and habitat. Primarily larger mammals are hit by the fragmentation caused by roads and pipelines. The GLOBIO methdology has modeled the current impact of human activities in the Arctic, as seen in this map. Infrastructure and settlements are used as proxies for human activities.
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Human impact: Barents region 2032 (policy first scenario) Human impact: Barents region 2032 (policy first scenario)
The greater region around the Barents Sea, with parts of Norway, Finland, Sweden and Russia, represents one of the most populated areas of the Arctic. The development of roads and other infrastructure fragments the fragile tundra and taiga and reduces the value of the habitats for larger mammals, such as reindeer, wolverines and bears. This illustrate the projected growth, according to the GEO-3 'policy first' scenario.
01 Nov 2002 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Human impact on the Arctic environment 2032 (markets first scenario) Human impact on the Arctic environment 2032 (markets first scenario)
Human activities influence the environment and reduce the value of forests, tundra and plains in terms of original biodiversity and habitat. Primarily larger mammals are hit by the fragmentation caused by roads and pipelines. The GLOBIO methdology has modeled the future impact of human activities in the Arctic, as seen in this map. Infrastructure and settlements are used as proxies for human activities. The scenario used in this map is the 'Marke...
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Impact of human activities on reindeer habitat - Barents region Impact of human activities on reindeer habitat - Barents region
The impact of infrastructure development on reindeer potentially threatens the cultural traditions of the Barents region indigenous people and their chosen way of life. The probability of impact on wildlife, vegetation and ecosystems is related to distance to different types of infrastructure. The distance zones of impact are lowest in forest and highest in open tundra. The extent of the zones are based upon several hundred field studies from int...
26 Jan 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Julien Rouaud, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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