HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Species

Tag: Species

Non-indigenous species over the 20th Century Non-indigenous species over the 20th Century
Both the number and rate of non-indigenous introductions to the Mediterranean have been increasing in recent years (UNEP/ MAP 2009). Currently, about a thousand non-indigenous aquatic species have been identified in the Mediterranean Sea, with a new species being introduced roughly every ten days. About 500 of these species are well-established; many others are one-off observations (UNEP/MAP 2012). In addition, there are also terrestrial no...
19 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Threatened species in Zimbabwe Threatened species in Zimbabwe
Through the intensified conservation programmes, including the Communal Areas Management Programme for Indigenous Resources (CAMPFIRE), the number of threatened species was reduced from 38 in 2000 to 32 in 2004. CAMPFIRE is a community-based natural resource management programme in which Rural District Councils, on behalf of communities on communal land, are granted the authority to market wildlife in their district to safari operators who then s...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Threatened species in Tanzania Threatened species in Tanzania
Tanzania is a large country with vast biological diversity and high numbers of threatened species,well documented. According to IUCN (2008), Tanzania has 10 008 known species of higher plants including endemic and non-endemic, out of which 235 (2.9 per cent) are threatened. Of the 316 known mammal species 42 are threatened (excluding marine mammals). There are 229 known breeding bird species out of which 33 are threatened (excluding those that mi...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Change in the number of threatened species in Namibia Change in the number of threatened species in Namibia
Threats to biodiversity include over-grazing, agriculture and mining (WWF 2006). Figure 4.34 shows that there are 58 threatened species in Namibia, an increase of 60 per cent in less than a decade, although some increase in the figure is due to new areas of study that have not been previously researched.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Threatened Species in Mozambique Threatened Species in Mozambique
Mozambique is also rich in birdlife, mammals, reptiles and amphibians, but the number of threatened species recorded jumped from 41 in 1996 to 108 in 2003 as shown in this figure, in part due to greater access to areas of study.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Change in the number of threatened species in Angola Change in the number of threatened species in Angola
This figure shows the change in numbers of threatened species, indicating that this spiked at 71 in 2003 following the end of the war when some areas became more accessible and counts resumed. The 2008 figure shows a reduction in the number of threatened species to 63.
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Change in biodiversity for selected species in Angola Change in biodiversity for selected species in Angola
This figure shows the percentage changes in biodiversity of some species, illustrating the reduction in diversity of mammals and molluscs, while others are steady or increasing (eg, birds).
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Threatened Species in the Zambezi River Basin countries Threatened Species in the Zambezi River Basin countries
Despite the abundance of wildlife resources in the basin, there are pressures that threaten the existence of this resource. Species that have become extinct in the basin in recent times include the blue wildebeest in Malawi, the Tsetsebe in Mozambique, and the Kob in Tanzania (SADC and SARDC 2008). Others face a high risk of extinction, and the number of threatened species across the basin continues to rise. The White (Grass) rhinocerous, Black (...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Re-infestation by 'Aedes aegypti' Re-infestation by 'Aedes aegypti'
Climate change affect the health of the population, not only through heat waves and waterborne diseases, but also as a result of the expansion of geographical areas conducive to the transmission of vector-borne diseases such as yellow fever, dengue and malaria. Species of mosquitoes, such as the group ‘Anopheles gambiae’, ‘A. funestus’, ‘A. darlingi’, ‘Culex quinquefasciatus’ and ‘Aedes aegypti’, are responsible for propagation of the majority of...
08 Mar 2010 - by Nieves López Izquierdo, Associate Consultant UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Total sturgeon catch in the Caspian Total sturgeon catch in the Caspian
The Caspian area is the world’s main producer of wild caviar (83% in 2003) and supplies the four largest markets, the European Union, United States, Switzerland and Japan. The construction of several hydroelectric power plants and dams along the Volga river significantly altered the flow of water into the delta and destroyed about 90 per cent of the sturgeon’s spawning grounds, which can be as far as several hundreds of kilometres upstrea...
07 Mar 2012 - by Original cartography by Philippe Rekacewicz (le Monde Diplomatique) assisted by Laura Margueritte and Cecile Marin, later updated by Riccardo Pravettoni (GRID-Arendal), Novikov, Viktor (Zoi Environment Network)
3
Historical decline of the Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) Historical decline of the Caspian seal (Pusa caspica)
The Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) population has declined by more than 90 per cent since the start of the 20th century, falling from more than 1 million individuals in 1900 to around 100 000 today (CEP, 2007). However, at present there are only around 7 to 15 thousand breeding females, meaning the population has very low reproductive capacity. The principle cause of the decline was unsustainable levels of hunting for seal oil and fur throug...
07 Mar 2012 - by Original cartography by Philippe Rekacewicz (le Monde Diplomatique) assisted by Laura Margueritte and Cecile Marin, later updated by Riccardo Pravettoni (GRID-Arendal), Novikov, Viktor (Zoi Environment Network)
4
Collapse of Tulka in the Caspian Collapse of Tulka in the Caspian
The comb jelly is well adapted to the habitat (salinity, temperature, and food range) and reproduces faster than endemic species. As it eats the same food as them, it has had a drastic effect on their numbers, upsetting the entire food chain. The commercial fishing industry is afraid of losing the kilka/tulka (g. Clupeonella) and other valuable catches, with consequent effects on human livelihoods and food sources for the Caspian seal and...
07 Mar 2012 - by GRID-Arendal
3
Comb jelly (Mnemiopsis leidyi) is spreading in the European seas Comb jelly (Mnemiopsis leidyi) is spreading in the European seas
North American comb jelly (Mnemiopsis leidyi) was brought accidentally to the Caspian in the ballast water of oil tankers. A voracious feeder on zooplankton and fish larvae, it first arrived in the Black Sea in the early 1980s where it changed the whole ecosystem and contributed to the collapse of more than two dozen major fishing grounds. From there the comb jelly also invaded the Azov, Marmara and Aegean Seas and most recently the Caspian.
01 Oct 2012 - by Philippe Rekacewicz (le Monde Diplomatique)
4
Origin and destination of selected species Origin and destination of selected species
North American comb jelly (Mnemiopsis leidyi) was brought accidentally to the Caspian in the ballast water of oil tankers. A voracious feeder on zooplankton and fish larvae, it first arrived in the Black Sea in the early 1980s where it changed the whole ecosystem and contributed to the collapse of more than two dozen major fishing grounds. From there the comb jelly also invaded the Azov, Marmara and Aegean Seas and most recently the Caspi...
07 Mar 2012 - by Original cartography by Philippe Rekacewicz (le Monde Diplomatique) assisted by Laura Margueritte and Cecile Marin, later updated by Riccardo Pravettoni (GRID-Arendal), Novikov, Viktor (Zoi Environment Network)
4
Ringed seal pupping lair, with the pup in the lair and the female approaching the haul-out hole from the water Ringed seal pupping lair, with the pup in the lair and the female approaching the haul-out hole from the water
Ringed seals are the 'classic' Arctic seal in many regards, being found as far north as the Pole because of their ability to keep breathing holes open in ice that can reach 2 metres in depth. This species is certainly one of the most vulnerable of the high-Arctic seals to the declines in the extent or quality of sea ice because so many aspects of their life-history and distribution are tied to ice. Ringed seals also require sufficient snow cover...
01 Nov 2007 - by Robert Barnes, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Barents Sea ecoregion conservation priority areas Barents Sea ecoregion conservation priority areas
The Barents Sea ecoregion - the part of the World Ocean north of the Nordic countries and Northwest Russia, has a unique environment with major sea bird colonies, rich benthic and plankton fauna and many major sea mammal species. To identify priority areas for conservation, thirty experts delineated sea areas based on ecological criteria in a WWF study.
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Barents Sea ecoregion conservation priority areas Barents Sea ecoregion conservation priority areas
The Barents Sea ecoregion - the part of the World Ocean north of the Nordic countries and Northwest Russia, has a unique environment with major sea bird colonies, rich benthic and plankton fauna and many major sea mammal species. To identify priority areas for conservation, thirty experts delineated sea areas based on ecological criteria in a WWF study.
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Forest composition case study in North America Forest composition case study in North America
Current and projected Ranges of Beech Trees in the US. A warmer climate may have significant effect on the forests. Decidous forests will probably move northwards and to higher altitudes, replacing coniferous forests in many areas. Some tree species will probably be replaced altogether, jeopardizing biological diversity in several places.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Forest composition case study in North America Forest composition case study in North America
Current and projected Ranges of Beech Trees in the US. A warmer climate may have significant effect on the forests. Decidous forests will probably move northwards and to higher altitudes, replacing coniferous forests in many areas. Some tree species will probably be replaced altogether, jeopardizing biological diversity in several places.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Ratio of protected areas in the Balkans Ratio of protected areas in the Balkans
The Balkans boast an exceptional wealth of biodiversity of flora and fauna. The main threat to species is increasing anthropogenic pressures such as hunting, farming and the collection of medicinal plants. Natural habitats are threatened by unsustainable economic activities in agriculture, illegal logging of forestry, illegal building and serious pollution. This poses several environmental problems such as erosion, a concern for most of the count...
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
3
      1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | Next