HomeAboutActivitiesMapsPhotosPublicationsNews
 
Home >> Services

Tag: Services

Catches in the Mauritania Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) 1950-2002 Catches in the Mauritania Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) 1950-2002
Marine fisheries represent a significant, but finite, natural resource for coastal countries. For some countries like Mauritania, the majority of the catches belong to international fleets. This represents a significant income for the country in question, but at the same time oppurtunities for value-added services and domestic employment are lost.
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Money grows on trees - direct values from community management in Tanzania Money grows on trees - direct values from community management in Tanzania
In an effort to bring back life to the degraded and over-used lands of the poor Shinyanga region of Tanzania, the government has brought back the traditional practice of Ngitili. Vegetation and trees are nurtured in enclosures and managed through the community. The practice initiative has been a success, through education, guidance and empowerment of local institutions. Not only are there benefits from the grown products, depicted in this figure,...
20 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Benefits from marine and coastal ecosystems and activities Benefits from marine and coastal ecosystems and activities
Besides the well-known economic value of fisheries, there are several other activities generating significant revenues in coastal and marine areas. This graphic discusses the economic benefits of coastal tourism, trade and shipping, offshore oil and gas, and fisheries. It also illustrates the estimated mean value of marine biomes such as estuaries and coastal reefs.
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Nigeria and the freshwater challenge Nigeria and the freshwater challenge
Out of the total precipitation reaching Nigeria, it can be separated into green and blue water. Green water (79% of the precipitation) represents the fraction of rainfall that generates soil moisture and which supports terrestrial ecosystems. It is not returned to groundwater and rivers, but will eventually evaporate or transpire through plants. Blue water, on the other hand, represents the fraction (21%) of the precipitation that runs into river...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Share of food in total household expenses (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan) Share of food in total household expenses (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan)
In all the areas bordering on the Caspian, priority must be given to diversifying activities and investment. Particular attention should be given to sectors such as tourism, agriculture and food production as well as services.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Gross National Income (GNI) per capita, for the Caspian Sea region countries Gross National Income (GNI) per capita, for the Caspian Sea region countries
Purchasing power parity (PPP) measures how much a currency can buy in terms of an international benchmark (usually dollars), since the cost of goods and services differs between countries. PPP is below the value of a US dollar in countries where the general price index is lower than in the US (as is the case for all five Caspian states -Azerbaijan, Iran, Kazakhstan, Russia and Turkmenistan, to varying extents), and above it where the prices are h...
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Awareness and preparedness for emergencies at local level (APELL) sites in India Awareness and preparedness for emergencies at local level (APELL) sites in India
Awareness and preparedness for emergencies at local level (APELL). APELL achieves its aims through community participation in emergency planning, via a structured dialogue between representatives of the source of the hazard (e.g. a land-owner), local authorities (the emergency services, e.g. fi re and /or police) and community leaders (who inform their constituencies). This dialogue is achieved through a ‘Co-ordinating Group’ which reviews the h...
07 Oct 2005 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Biodiversity loss: state and scenarios 2006 and 2050 Biodiversity loss: state and scenarios 2006 and 2050
These projections of biodiversity loss from 2000 to 2050 were produced by the GLOBIO consortium for UNEP's Global Environment Outlook 4. Across the GEO scenarios and regions, global biodiversity continues to be threatened, with strong implications for ecosystem services and human well-being. All regions continue to experience declines in terrestrial biodiversity in each of the scenarios. The greatest losses are seen in Markets First, followed by ...
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Awareness and preparedness for emergencies at local level (APELL) sites in India Awareness and preparedness for emergencies at local level (APELL) sites in India
Awareness and preparedness for emergencies at local level (APELL). APELL achieves its aims through community participation in emergency planning, via a structured dialogue between representatives of the source of the hazard (e.g. a land-owner), local authorities (the emergency services, e.g. fi re and /or police) and community leaders (who inform their constituencies). This dialogue is achieved through a ‘Co-ordinating Group’ which reviews the h...
01 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Population trends for Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan Population trends for Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan
Output by the Central Asian economies dropped sharply after independence with subsequent fall in living conditions. Poverty is widespread, especially in rural areas. Communal services have broken down in many areas, straining relations between local authorities and the population. Only recently have some of the economies shown signs of improving, but GDP growth rates have not helped to reduce poverty and social inequality. The unemployment rates ...
16 Mar 2006 - by Viktor Novikov, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Uganda: quantifying the importance of environment and natural resources Uganda: quantifying the importance of environment and natural resources
Estimations calculate that the environment and natural resources sector should contribute USD 791 million to the Uganda GDP, excluding benefits like ecosystem services. In the formal figures, only USD 405 million is recorded, where subsistence use and informal markets are not captured. Over 90% of the employment in the sector is secondary processing and subsistence use. Sustainable natural resource use implies that this sector will continue to pr...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Household income by source, Masvingo province, Zimbabwe Household income by source, Masvingo province, Zimbabwe
A study of households (rich and poor) in the Masvingo Province in southeastern Zimbabwe provides a good example of how agricultural income complements wild income and how it compares with other income sources such as wages and remittances. Agricultural income—from crops and home gardens—contributed 30 percent of total household income (cash and subsistence income combined). Livestock rearing—a modified form of agriculture that relies on wild fora...
02 Nov 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Linkages between ecosystem services and human well-being Linkages between ecosystem services and human well-being
There are many linkages between categories of ecosystem services and components of human well-being. They includes indications of the extent to which it is possible for socioeconomic factors to mediate the linkage. For example, if it is possible to purchase a substitute for a degraded ecosystem service, then there is a high potential for mediation.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Net change in components of human well-being between 2000 and 2050 Net change in components of human well-being between 2000 and 2050
Order from Strength, which focuses on reactive policies in a regionalized world, has the least favorable outcomes for human well-being, as the global distribution of ecosystem services and human resources that underpin human well-being are increasingly skewed. Wealthy populations generally meet most material needs but experience psychological unease.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
Number of ecosystem services enhanced or degraded by 2050 Number of ecosystem services enhanced or degraded by 2050
100% degradation means that all the services in the category were degraded in 2050 compared with 2000, while 50% improvement could mean that three out of six services were enhanced and the rest were unchanged or that four out of six were enhanced and one was degraded. The total number of services evaluated for each category was six provisioning services, nine regulating services, and five cultural services.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Characteristic time and space scales related to ecosystems and their services Characteristic time and space scales related to ecosystems and their services
The time scale of change refers to the time required for the effects of a perturbation of a process to be expressed. Inertia refers to the delay or slowness in the response of a system to factors altering their rate of change, including continuation of change in the system after the cause of that change has been removed.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
2
A multifunctional perspective of agriculture A multifunctional perspective of agriculture
In IAASTD, multifunctionality is used solely to express the inescapable interconnectedness of agriculture’s different roles and functions. The concept of multifunctionality recognizes agriculture as a multi-output activity producing not only commodities (food, fodder, fibers and biofuels), but also non-commodity outputs such as ecosystem services, landscape amenities and cultural heritages.
03 Jan 2008 - by IAASTD/Ketill Berger, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
Natural resources - agricultural potential Natural resources - agricultural potential
Soils underpin the production of a wide range of agricultural and industrial goods and services. Soil productivity is essential to agricultural activities - for food security, cash income and supporting the livelihoods of the poor. Agriculture is the major engine of economic growth in a majority of developing countries – for instance low income developing countries have a high share of agriculture in gross domestic product. This map presents a ...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
4
Natural resources for pro-poor economic growth Natural resources for pro-poor economic growth
To alleviate rural poverty, one way is to sustainably use the natural resources available to the people and the communities. By supporting and expanding fisheries, small-scale mining, forestry, ecosystem services and other similar activities and making it easier to run a businesses out of these, economic growth can be gained. This illustration symbolizes this in the form of a tree, with different natural resources as leaves and the trunk being ma...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
3
Natural resource - solar power (potential) Natural resource - solar power (potential)
More than two billion people cannot access affordable energy services today. They depend on inefficient locally collected and often unprocessed biomass-based fuels, such as crop residues, wood, and animal dung. Because convenient, affordable energy can contribute to a household’s productivity and income generating potential, its availability can help families and communities break out of the cycle of poverty. At the same time it also provides gro...
12 May 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
5
      1 2 3 | Next