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Sanitation trends in Zimbabwe Sanitation trends in Zimbabwe
Progress in achieving water and sanitation targets is off track. Urban water and sanitation systems are in urgent need of renewal, and have faced serious problems that led to localized outbreaks of cholera and typhoid. The country has to raise safe water coverage in rural areas from 61 per cent to 85 per cent and to raise access to improved sanitation from 30.5 per cent to 71 per cent (Government of Zimbabwe 2010).
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of population without access to improved sanitation in Zambia Proportion of population without access to improved sanitation in Zambia
The proportion of national population without sustainable access to an improved water source had dropped below 40 per cent by 2008 and is on course to meet the MDG target of 25.5 per cent by 2015. With respect to sanitation, however, the situation is getting worse, and the proportion of the population without access to good sanitation rose by more than 10 per cent from 26 per cent in 1991 to 36.1 per cent in 2006, far from the target of 13 per ce...
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Access to sanitation facilities in Tanzania Access to sanitation facilities in Tanzania
Sewerage service coverage in urban centres increased from around four per cent in 1990, to six per cent in 2000 and 17 per cent in 2008. There has been a steady increase of coverage in improved sanitation facilities from 40.2 per cent in 2001, 50 per cent in 2006, to 55 per cent in 2007, as shown in Figure 4.42. Similar progress has been recorded in Zanzibar, with the proportion of population using an improved sanitation facility in urban areas r...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Households with access to basic sanitation in Namibia Households with access to basic sanitation in Namibia
Access by urban households to safe drinking water is slightly less than 100 per cent, but decreasing. Access of rural households to safe drinking water was 88 per cent in 2008, up from 67 per cent in 2000. The government has improved water supply to rural communities through the provision of new boreholes and the rehabilitation of existing boreholes, as well as the development of pipelines. Namibia recycles water, especially in urban areas. This...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Access to clean water and improved sanitation in Mozambique Access to clean water and improved sanitation in Mozambique
The proportion of the population with access to safe drinking water has increased significantly to 56 per cent in 2009, from 37.3 per cent in 1997. The national target for 2015 is 70 per cent. The proportion of the population with access to improved sanitation has increased from 40 per cent in 2003 to 45 per cent in 2009, with a target of 50 per cent for 2015. Thus, Mozambique is likely to meet the 2015 targets for access to water and sanitation...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of population with access to improve sanitation in Malawi Proportion of population with access to improve sanitation in Malawi
According to the Malawi Development Goals Report 2009, the country has already surpassed the MDGs targets for access to clean water and improved sanitation, and is well on its way to achieving 100 per cent for the latter.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of people using improved sanitation facility in Botswana Proportion of people using improved sanitation facility in Botswana
Due to deliberate policy and strategic action, Botswana is in the envious position of having met its water and sanitation targets well before the MDG targets and the timelines for its own Vision 2016. More than 90 per cent of the population in urban and rural areas has access to drinking water and sanitation.
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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The sanitation ladder The sanitation ladder
Per capita costs of sewage treatment go up roughly tenfold from basic latrines to tertiary treatment of collected waste water.
16 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Millennium Development Goals Access to sanitation in Asia Millennium Development Goals Access to sanitation in Asia
Proportion of population using an improved sanitation facility in Asia
09 Mar 2012 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID-Arendal
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p04-05-sanitation p04-05-sanitation
About p04-05-sanitation
13 Feb 2007 - by
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Toilets needed to meet the MDG sanitation target by 2015 Toilets needed to meet the MDG sanitation target by 2015
Ensure environmental sustainability goal (goal 7) among the Millennium Development Goals address sanitation, through the target: Halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and sanitation (target 10). The indicator in this graphic display the current status on one of the indicators for this target as an estimation on the number of toilets per household that needs to be constructed from now (2005) up ...
20 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Lack of access to safe water Lack of access to safe water
Ensure environmental sustainability goal (goal 7) among the Millennium Development Goals address sanitation, through the target: Halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and sanitation (target 10). The indicator in this graphic display the current status on one of the indicators for this target, using a cartogram, where the shape of the countries are distorted to the proportions in the map. The ne...
20 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Access to safe drinking water Access to safe drinking water
There are currently more than 1000 million people in the world that lacks access to an easily accessible and safe water source, such as a connection to water mains or a protected well. Instead, water access is limited or available through unprotected sources. The target, under the Millennium Development Goals, is to halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and sanitation.
28 Sep 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Urban and rural water supply and sanitation Urban and rural water supply and sanitation
The graphic shows the amount of water supply versus sanitation coverage between the world and developing nations in percentage. It shows statistics from 1990 and 2000, as well as comparing rural to urban.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Urban water cycle Urban water cycle
This graphic illustrates the impact of human activity on groundwater. It shows that groundwater is obtained from periurban wellfields and urban wells, then used and disposed of as wastewater through pluvial drainage, piped sewage and on-site sanitation and industrial effluent disposal. It also shows that wastewater is treated and then reused for irrigation, with excess flows re-entering the aquifers.
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Tajikistan, topographic map Tajikistan, topographic map
Tajikistan is located in Central Asia, west of China, comprising of 143,100 sq km. It has a population of 7,163,506 (2005). Major environmental concerns are: inadequate sanitation facilities; increasing levels of soil salinity; industrial pollution; excessive pesticides.
04 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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No shelter - refugees, sanitation and slums No shelter - refugees, sanitation and slums
In the face of any calamity we instinctively take refuge under a roof. This is little use against a chemical or nuclear accident, but for many there is no other resort. The number of people currently living in shanty towns is rising in all the big cities of the developing world, where urban growth is generally uncontrolled. The map shows how small the proportion of city dwellers with improved access to sanitation in many places is, giving an ide...
01 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global human development indicators Global human development indicators
Poverty is multidimensional. It varies in scale and context (political, social, cultural, ecological, historical, economic). The rural poor face different challenges from those in urban areas: they are concerned with natural resources (access, quality), whereas the urban poor care about access to energy, housing and sanitation, and about the quality and availability of water.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, assisted by Lucie Dejouhanet, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Poverty and cholera in Kwazulu-Natal January 2001 Poverty and cholera in Kwazulu-Natal January 2001
Data and maps on poverty, sanitation, safe and clean water and the incidence of cholera were used to help contain the spread of cholera in the Kwazulu Natal province in January 2001. Poverty and cholera data sets showed that the cholera outbreak followed a river flood plain and moved through and towards poor areas.
29 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Proportion of population with improved sanitation coverage in 2002 Proportion of population with improved sanitation coverage in 2002
Access to improved sanitation is estimated by the percentage of the population using the following sanitation facilities: connection to a public sewer, connection to a septic system, pour-flush latrine, simple pit latrine (a portion of pit latrines are also considered unimproved sanitation), and ventilated improved pit latrine.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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