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Sources of emissions of nutrients in the Mediterranean region, 2008 Sources of emissions of nutrients in the Mediterranean region, 2008
Nutrients in seawater present a paradox. Nutrients are, of course, essential for life. In the oligotrophic environment of the Mediterranean, the ecosystems with the most nutrients are generally the most productive and diverse. At the same time, many Mediterranean nearshore areas are threatened by nutrient over-enrichment due to coastal and watershed development. Many developed coastal areas suffer particularly from increased influx of dissolve...
19 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Dead zones and fertilizers Dead zones and fertilizers
The production and use of reactive nitrogen based artificial fertilizers has had huge global benefits providing food for billions through the green revolution. The down side of the increased availability of cheap manufactured nitrogen fertilizer products has been global environment problems associated with excess nutrients, specifically the problems of eutrophication, coastal hypoxic zones and nitrate contaminated groundwater. Tracing the format...
16 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Production of nitrogen Production of nitrogen
The rapid increase in the production of reactive nitrogen via the Haber-Bosch process correlates closely with the increase in world population from about 2.6 billion in 1950 to over 6 billion in 2000 (figure page 78). Based on the figures from Dawson and Hilton (2011), over 2 billion tonnes of reactive nitrogen was manufactured in that period. The enormous increase in artificial fertilizer production catalyzed by the Haber-Bosch process has a...
16 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Contrast between contemporary and pre-disturbance transports of total nitrogen through inland aquatic systems resulting from anthropogenic acceleration of this nutrient cycle Contrast between contemporary and pre-disturbance transports of total nitrogen through inland aquatic systems resulting from anthropogenic acceleration of this nutrient cycle
While the peculiarities of individual pollutants, rivers, and governance define the specific character of water pollution, the general patterns observed for nitrogen are representative of anthropogenic changes to the transport of waterborne constituents. Elevated contemporary loadings to one part of the system (such as croplands) often reverberate to other parts of the system (to coastal zones, for example), exceeding the capacity of natural syst...
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Contrast between contemporary and pre-disturbance transports of total nitrogen through inland aquatic systems resulting from anthropogenic acceleration of this nutrient cycle Contrast between contemporary and pre-disturbance transports of total nitrogen through inland aquatic systems resulting from anthropogenic acceleration of this nutrient cycle
While the peculiarities of individual pollutants, rivers, and governance define the specific character of water pollution, the general patterns observed for nitrogen are representative of anthropogenic changes to the transport of waterborne constituents. Elevated contemporary loadings to one part of the system (such as croplands) often reverberate to other parts of the system (to coastal zones, for example), exceeding the capacity of natural syst...
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global soil degradation Global soil degradation
In many parts of the world natural resources have been treated as though unlimited, and totally resilient to human exploitation. This perception has exacerbated the conflicting agricultural demands on natural capital, as have other exploitative commercial enterprises. Both have affected local cultures and had undesirable long-term impacts on the sustainability of resources. The consequences include: land degradation (about 2,000 million ha of lan...
03 Jan 2008 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global soil degradation Global soil degradation
In many parts of the world natural resources have been treated as though unlimited, and totally resilient to human exploitation. This perception has exacerbated the conflicting agricultural demands on natural capital, as have other exploitative commercial enterprises. Both have affected local cultures and had undesirable long-term impacts on the sustainability of resources. The consequences include: land degradation (about 2,000 million ha of lan...
03 Jan 2008 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arable land in the Baltic Sea region Arable land in the Baltic Sea region
Ratio of arable land out of total land use in the Baltic Sea drainage basin. Agriculture is one of the main contributors to the nutrient (in this case, primarily nitrogen) influx into the Baltic Sea, and thus a main driver for the eutrophication problems in the sea. The displays the situation at approximately 1990.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arable land in the Baltic Sea region Arable land in the Baltic Sea region
Ratio of arable land out of total land use in the Baltic Sea drainage basin. Agriculture is one of the main contributors to the nutrient (in this case, primarily nitrogen) influx into the Baltic Sea, and thus a main driver for the eutrophication problems in the sea. The displays the situation at approximately 1990.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Pasture Land - Baltic Sea drainage basin Pasture Land - Baltic Sea drainage basin
Ratio of pasture land total land use in the Baltic Sea drainage basin. Agriculture is one of the main contributors to the nutrient (in this case, primarily nitrogen) influx into the Baltic Sea, and thus a main driver for the eutrophication problems in the sea. The displays the situation at approximately 1990.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Pasture Land - Baltic Sea drainage basin Pasture Land - Baltic Sea drainage basin
Ratio of pasture land total land use in the Baltic Sea drainage basin. Agriculture is one of the main contributors to the nutrient (in this case, primarily nitrogen) influx into the Baltic Sea, and thus a main driver for the eutrophication problems in the sea. The displays the situation at approximately 1990.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Mean nutrient concentration in the coast of Romania Mean nutrient concentration in the coast of Romania
Illustration in a set of graphics prepared for a pilot assessment report on the Black Sea drainage basin, for the UNEP Global Impact on Waters Assessment (GIWA). All data and information were prepared in close collaboration with the GIWA Black Sea team and the GIWA secretariat. The graphics were never not used in this form in the final report on the Black Sea, published in 2005.
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Mean nutrient concentration in the coast of Romania Mean nutrient concentration in the coast of Romania
Illustration in a set of graphics prepared for a pilot assessment report on the Black Sea drainage basin, for the UNEP Global Impact on Waters Assessment (GIWA). All data and information were prepared in close collaboration with the GIWA Black Sea team and the GIWA secretariat. The graphics were never not used in this form in the final report on the Black Sea, published in 2005.
10 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sites with dead zones (oxygen depletion on the sea bottom) Sites with dead zones (oxygen depletion on the sea bottom)
Dead zones (hypoxic i.e. oxygen deficient water) in the coastal zones are increasing, typically surrounding major industrial and agricultural centers. This is commonly occuring due to nutrient pollution, in the form of nitrogen and phosphorous leading to algal blooms and eutrophication
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sites with dead zones (oxygen depletion on the sea bottom) Sites with dead zones (oxygen depletion on the sea bottom)
Dead zones (hypoxic i.e. oxygen deficient water) in the coastal zones are increasing, typically surrounding major industrial and agricultural centers. This is commonly occuring due to nutrient pollution, in the form of nitrogen and phosphorous leading to algal blooms and eutrophication
01 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Phosphate levels in major basins Phosphate levels in major basins
A comparison of the major watersheds between the two decades showed that Northern Europe and North America had lower phosphate concentrations, while the Ganges and Brahmaputra watersheds in South Central Asia had higher concentrations. Nutrient control programmes in municipal and agricultural activities may be key factors in the observed reductions in phosphate concentrations.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Phosphate levels in major basins Phosphate levels in major basins
A comparison of the major watersheds between the two decades showed that Northern Europe and North America had lower phosphate concentrations, while the Ganges and Brahmaputra watersheds in South Central Asia had higher concentrations. Nutrient control programmes in municipal and agricultural activities may be key factors in the observed reductions in phosphate concentrations.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Nitrate in major rivers Nitrate in major rivers
Considering the data for all the rivers at the continental level, there has been little change in nitrate (NO3-N) concentrations between the two decades under comparison. Changes in the median value were not statistically significant. European rivers showed the highest nitrate loads transported to the marine environment. Comparing data from the two decades, North American and European rivers have remained fairly stable, while major river basins i...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Land cover - Baltic Sea region Land cover - Baltic Sea region
The Baltic Sea region is covered in primarily forested land and crop land, in the taiga and temperate forest regions. Agricultural land is a main driver for nutrient inputs to the Baltic Sea, and thus eutorphication, and is thus relevant. Forest lands acts as a net buffer for nutrients, unless it is heavily diked and/or fertilised.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Land cover - Baltic Sea region Land cover - Baltic Sea region
The Baltic Sea region is covered in primarily forested land and crop land, in the taiga and temperate forest regions. Agricultural land is a main driver for nutrient inputs to the Baltic Sea, and thus eutorphication, and is thus relevant. Forest lands acts as a net buffer for nutrients, unless it is heavily diked and/or fertilised.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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