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Human Impact, Greater Asian Mountains region with specific examples Human Impact, Greater Asian Mountains region with specific examples
Presentation of areas where infrastructure development, intense land use or agriculture has resulted in biodiversity loss in the Greater Asiam Mountain region. The locations illustrate some of the great variety in the region and are presented in the 'Fall of the Water' report
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Rapid decline of the San Quintin glacier, North Patagonia Rapid decline of the San Quintin glacier, North Patagonia
Glaciers grow and retreat at intervals depending on local climate changes, particularly variations in temperature and precipitation . Retreating and diminishing mountain glaciers all over the world, except in the Antarctica, indicate a general trend of global warming.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Rapid retreat of glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru Rapid retreat of glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru
There is now ample evidence of a major retreat of most mountain glaciers during the last 100 years in response to widespread increases in temperature. In recent decades, the rate of glacial recession has increased tremendously. Mountain glaciers supply moisture to mountain forests during thedry and warm seasons. With retreating mountain glaciers, the risk of forest fires increases, with a subsequent reduction of forested areas. Smaller glaciers...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Quick retreat of the Santa Rosa glacier, Peru Quick retreat of the Santa Rosa glacier, Peru
Several mountain glaciers now disappear at a frightening rate as in the Santa Rosa glacier of Peru. A warmer climate often leads to increased precipitation. Much of the increased precipitation comes as rain instead of snow, mostly in the winter and to a lesser extent during the autumn and the spring. The winter rains fall over existing snow, causing increased melting. As the ice and snow cover is reduced, the albedo of the area is reduced as we...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Retreat of the ice cap on the Volcano Nevado Santa Isabel (Colombia) Retreat of the ice cap on the Volcano Nevado Santa Isabel (Colombia)
Shows the retreat of the glacier on the volcano Nevado Santa Isabel and the correlation of global warming. With spectacular mountain peak glaciers melting away, the area becomes less attractive to tourists. In addition, the local forestry and agricultural fertility suffer.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sea level rise due to the melting of mountain and subpolar glaciers Sea level rise due to the melting of mountain and subpolar glaciers
Oceans change as a result of the impact of climatic variability on glaciers and ice caps that further contributes to fluctuation sin sea leve. Observational and modelling studies of glaciers and ice caps indicate an average sea level increase of 0.2 to 0.4 mm/yr during the 20th century. Since the Last Glacial Maximum about 20,000 years ago, sea level has risen by over 120 m at locations far from present and former ice sheets, as a result of los...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Rural and urban population in the Balkans Rural and urban population in the Balkans
In the meantime, the rural exodus is continuing all over the region, particularly in Albania where people are deserting mountain areas and the population of Tirana has risen from 200 000 at the end of the communist era to almost a million. The newcomers cram into the city outskirts lacking any proper infrastructure. A similar pattern may be seen in Belgrade, Sarajevo and Skopje.
30 Nov 2007 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Stephane Kluser, Matthias Beilstein, Ieva Rucevska, Cecile Marin, Otto Simonett
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West Stara Planina Mountains West Stara Planina Mountains
In 2006, the Stara Planina Euroregion was established to foster trans-boundary cooperation between border municipalities in Serbia and Bulgaria, and assist governments with planning, and implementing cooperation and regional development policies.
30 Nov 2007 - by UNEP/DEWA/GRID-Europe
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Impact of Climate Change on Mountain Vegetation Zones Impact of Climate Change on Mountain Vegetation Zones
No data
20 Jun 2009 - by Philippe Rekacewicz assisted by Cecile Marin, Agnes Stienne, Guilio Frigieri, Riccardo Pravettoni, Laura Margueritte and Marion Lecoquierre.
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Existing radioactive waste disposal and proposal alternatives for storage Existing radioactive waste disposal and proposal alternatives for storage
Radioactive waste presents a unique problem, where it has to be handled with care to prevent radiation exposure for people, wildlife and contamination. Products from nuclear activities can be reprocessed to a certain degree, but a fair bit of the waste needs to be stored or disposed of in a safe manner. Options include storing in deep mountain chambers/caverns, under the sea floor or even sending it out into space.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Ore production and waste generation at Ok Tedi Mine Ore production and waste generation at Ok Tedi Mine
The Ok Tedi mine is located high in the rain forest covered Star Mountains of Papua New Guinea. Prior to 1981 the local Wopkaimin people lived a subsistence existence in one of the most isolated places on earth. That was before the 10 000 strong town of Tabubil suddenly appeared in the middle of their community. The Ok Tedi mine was built on the world’s largest gold and copper deposit (gold ore capping the main copper deposit). From the very begi...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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The Caucasus ecoregion, topographic map The Caucasus ecoregion, topographic map
The Caucasus ecoregion covers a total area of 580,000 km2, includes six countries - Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iran, Russian and Turkey - and follows the ecoregion definition prepared by WWF in their Action plan for Caucasus. The Greater Caucasus Mountain Range with its lofty peaks forms a formidable barrier between the northern and southern parts of the ecoregion. The Lesser Caucasus mountain chain extends across Georgia, Turkey, Armenia, Aze...
04 Oct 2005 - by Manana Kurtubadze, cartographer
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Landcover - Europe and Central Asia Landcover - Europe and Central Asia
The Western part of the Eurasian continent, has some of the most populated and fertile parts of the World. Central Europe is densely populated, with few remaining fragments of undisturbed habitat, except for the mountain ranges. In the north - Scandinavia and Northern Russia, there is the taiga belt, with vast expanses of confierous forest, and further north, there is tundra and glaciers. Central Asia and Caucasus is a diverse region, with desert...
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water towers of Asia - glaciers, water and population in the greater Himalayas-Hindu Kush-Tien Shan-Tibet region Water towers of Asia - glaciers, water and population in the greater Himalayas-Hindu Kush-Tien Shan-Tibet region
The Himalayas–Hindu Kush, Kunlun Shan, Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges function as water towers, providing water to people through much of Asia. The glacier-fed rivers originating from the Himalaya mountain ranges surrounding the Tibetan Plateau comprise the largest river run-off from any single location in the world. While the mountains are homes to some 170 million people, the rivers that drain these mountains influence the lives of about 4...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Landcover - Europe and Central Asia Landcover - Europe and Central Asia
The Western part of the Eurasian continent, has some of the most populated and fertile parts of the World. Central Europe is densely populated, with few remaining fragments of undisturbed habitat, except for the mountain ranges. In the north - Scandinavia and Northern Russia, there is the taiga belt, with vast expanses of confierous forest, and further north, there is tundra and glaciers. Central Asia and Caucasus is a diverse region, with desert...
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Climate change impact on mountain vegetation zones Climate change impact on mountain vegetation zones
The figure shows a comparison of current vegetation zones at a hypothetical dry temperate mountain site with simulated vegetation zones under a climate-warming scenario. Mountains cover about 20% of the Earth's continents and serve as an important water source for most major rivers. Paleologic records indicate that climate warming in the past has caused vegetation zones to shift to higher elevations, resulting in the loss of some species and ecos...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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CO2 concentration in the atmosphere (1959-1998) CO2 concentration in the atmosphere (1959-1998)
CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere have been measured at an altitude of about 4,000 meters on the peak of Mauna Loa mountain in Hawaii since 1958. The measurements at this location, remote from local sources of pollution, have clearly shown that atmospheric concentrations of CO2 are increasing. The mean concentration of approximately 316 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1958 rose to approximately 369 ppmv in 1998. The annual variation is d...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human Impact - North America Human Impact - North America
Most areas of North America that have any economic significance - for agriculture, habitation or siliviculture has been converted and modifiedf for human use. Areas with lower degrees of disturbance and fragmentation are found in the vast Arctic areas of Canada and Alaska, as well as in the mountain ranges.
13 Sep 2006 - by Torstein Olsen and Einar Lieng, Statens Kartverk (for UNEP/GRID-Arendal)
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Protected areas and conservation hotspots in Albania Protected areas and conservation hotspots in Albania
The graphic shows the protected areas of Albania, the proposed areas for protection and areas with endangered species. Albania is well known for its high diversity of ecosystems and habitats. Within its territory there are maritime ecosystems, coastal zones, lakes, rivers, evergreen and broadleaf bushes, broadleaf forests, pine forests, alpine and sub-alpine pastures and meadows, and high mountain ecosystems. It is rich in forest and pasture reso...
11 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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CO2 concentration in the atmosphere (1959-1998) CO2 concentration in the atmosphere (1959-1998)
CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere have been measured at an altitude of about 4,000 meters on the peak of Mauna Loa mountain in Hawaii since 1958. The measurements at this location, remote from local sources of pollution, have clearly shown that atmospheric concentrations of CO2 are increasing. The mean concentration of approximately 316 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in 1958 rose to approximately 369 ppmv in 1998. The annual variation is d...
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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