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Trends in permafrost temperatures in the central and northern Mackenzie Valley, 1984-2006 Trends in permafrost temperatures in the central and northern Mackenzie Valley, 1984-2006
Temperature monitoring in Canada indicates a warming of shallow permafrost over the last two to three decades. Since the mid-1980s, shallow permafrost (upper 20-30 m) has generally warmed in the Mackenzie Valley. The greatest increases in temperature were 0.3 to 1°C per decade in the cold and thick permafrost of the central and northern valley. In the southern Mackenzie Valley, where permafrost is thin and close to 0°C, no significant trend in pe...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Global International Waters Assessment Tools Global International Waters Assessment Tools
Global International Waters Assessment's (GIWA) assessment tools for monitoring the world's water resources, incorporating five major environmental concerns and application of the DPSIR framework (driving forces-pressure-state-impact-response), are now beginning to yield results of practical use for management decisions. This graphic explains the GIWA Assessment Methodology and GIWA's five main environmental concerns, which are: freshwater shorta...
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in marine and freshwater populations Trends in marine and freshwater populations
The Marine Species Population Index provides an assessment of the average change over time in the populations of 217 species of marine mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The index represents the average value of six regional ocean indices. More pronounced declines are seen in the southern oceans, which is attributed to the fact that major losses and degradation of marine ecosystems in the industrialised world took place prior to 1970. Marine sp...
17 May 2005 - by Delphine Digout, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic conservation area (CAFF), topographic map, ABA version (2010) Arctic conservation area (CAFF), topographic map, ABA version (2010)
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessment, protected areas and conservation strategies are all tasks under this working group. The area that the working group primarily addresses is presented in this map.
01 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic conservation area (CAFF), topographic map Arctic conservation area (CAFF), topographic map
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessment, protected areas and conservation strategies are all tasks under this working group. The area that the working group primarily addresses is presented in this map.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Tree line in the Arctic Tree line in the Arctic
This graphic shows the location of the arctic tree line. Boreal forest occurs only to the south of the tree line (the dark green line on the graphic). The Arctic area, as defined by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), is limited by the orange line on the graphic.
04 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Tree line in the Arctic Tree line in the Arctic
This graphic shows the location of the arctic tree line. Boreal forest occurs only to the south of the tree line (the dark green line on the graphic). The Arctic area, as defined by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), is limited by the orange line on the graphic.
07 Oct 2005 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic conservation area (CAFF), political map Arctic conservation area (CAFF), political map
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessment, protected areas and conservation strategies are all tasks under this working group. The area that the working group primarily addresses is presented in this map.
16 Sep 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic conservation area (CAFF), topographic map Arctic conservation area (CAFF), topographic map
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessment, protected areas and conservation strategies are all tasks under this working group. The area that the working group primarily addresses is presented in this map.
16 Sep 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Protected areas and wilderness Protected areas and wilderness
Wilderness areas in the Arctic, representing vast expanses of tundra and taiga that sees very little human disturbance and stress have been determined by an analysis prepared by the UN Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre in 2001. Overlaid with protected areas, this graphic highlights the areas that are currently not under International protection, and thus should be made a priority for conservation.
06 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Northern Hemisphere snow-cover extent anomalies 1966-2005 Northern Hemisphere snow-cover extent anomalies 1966-2005
Data from satellite monitoring from 1966 to 2005 show that mean monthly snow-cover extent in the Northern Hemisphere is decreasing at a rate of 1.3 per cent per decade. For the calendar year of 2006 average snow-cover extent was 24.9 million km2, which is 0.6 million km2 less than the 37-year average. In the Northern Hemisphere, spring and summer show the strongest decreases in snow-cover extent. Satellite observations of snow-cover extent show a...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Formation of lakes and glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs) by Medvezhi Glacier, Pamirs Formation of lakes and glacier lake outburst floods (GLOFs) by Medvezhi Glacier, Pamirs
The increasing number of glacial and moraine lakes in Central Asian mountains is a matter of great concern. One of the surging glaciers that poses a potential threat is the 15 km long Medvezhi (Bear) Glacier in the Pamirs mountains of Tajikistan. Its surges have repeatedly caused lake formation, outburst and subsequent floodings. In 1963 and 1973, the surge of the glacier was so significant (1 to 2 km increase in length) that the ice dam exceeded...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Glaciers monitored through the World Glacier Monitoring Service Glaciers monitored through the World Glacier Monitoring Service
Worldwide collection of information about ongoing glacier changes was initiated in 1894 with the foundation of the International Glacier Commission at the 6th International Geological Congress in Zurich, Switzerland. Today, the World Glacier Monitoring Service continues to collect and publish standardized information on ongoing glacier changes. WGMS is a service of the Commission for the Cryospheric Sciences of the International Union of Geodesy ...
01 Jun 2007 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic conservation area (CAFF), political map Arctic conservation area (CAFF), political map
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessment, protected areas and conservation strategies are all tasks under this working group. The area that the working group primarily addresses is presented in this map.
11 Feb 2008 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Methane in Air Above Water Surface Methane in Air Above Water Surface
Mixing ratio of methane in the air above the water surface measured along a ship’s route in September 2005. The dotted line shows the Latitude-specific monthly average of 1.85 parts per million by volume established for the Barrow, Alaska, USA, monitoring station at 71° 19’ N, 156° 35’ W (http://www. cmdl.noaa.gov/ccgg/insitu.html); this is the normal level of methane in the atmosphere at this latitude.
27 Oct 2009 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Water desalination Water desalination
Desalination is an increasingly important practice to secure clean water in a number of countries. Monitoring is key to minimize negative impacts on the ecosystem.
01 Mar 2010 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Distribution and trends of wild Rangifer in the Arctic Distribution and trends of wild Rangifer in the Arctic
Distribution and observed trends of wild Rangifer populations throughout the circumpolar Arctic (from The Circum Arctic Rangifer Monitoring and Assessment Network, CARMA). Note: Wild boreal forest reindeer have not been mapped by CARMA and thus are not represented here. Currently wild reindeer and caribou have declined by about 33% since populations (herds) peaked in the 1990s and early 2000s (3.8 million compared to 5.6 million) which followed ...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Arctic conservation area (CAFF), topographic map, ABA version (2010) Arctic conservation area (CAFF), topographic map, ABA version (2010)
The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna is a working group under the Arctic Council, for the countries of Russia, Denmark, USA, Canada, Sweden, Iceland, Norway and Finland and indigenous peoples. Monitoring, assessment, protected areas and conservation strategies are all tasks under this working group. The area that the working group primarily addresses is presented in this map.
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Trends in Arctic vegetation productivity 1982-2005 (Greening of the Arctic) Trends in Arctic vegetation productivity 1982-2005 (Greening of the Arctic)
Arctic vegetation has undergone enormous change in the past, most notably in response to the glacial and interglacial periods of the Quaternary. Data from many sources and at several scales suggest that recent climate change is already affecting terrestrial Arctic ecosystems. Comparisons of historical and contemporary aerial photographs provide evidence that Arctic vegetation has already undergone significant shifts in recent decades, foreshadowi...
17 Mar 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, GRID-Arendal & CAFF
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Distribution and trends of wild Rangifer in the Arctic Distribution and trends of wild Rangifer in the Arctic
Distribution and observed trends of wild Rangifer populations throughout the circumpolar Arctic (from The Circum Arctic Rangifer Monitoring and Assessment Network, CARMA). Note: Wild boreal forest reindeer have not been mapped by CARMA and thus are not represented here. Currently wild reindeer and caribou have declined by about 33% since populations (herds) peaked in the 1990s and early 2000s (3.8 million compared to 5.6 million) which followed ...
01 May 2010 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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