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Emissions of greenhouse gases in Norway, C2F4 and C2F6 85-96 Emissions of greenhouse gases in Norway, C2F4 and C2F6 85-96
The graphic shows emissions of C2F4 and C2F6 in CO2 equivalents in Norway from 1985 to 1996. C2F4 and C2F6 are primarily results of the production process of alumunium. Their atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be around 50 000 years.
12 Feb 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emissions of N20 in Norway, 85-96 Emissions of N20 in Norway, 85-96
The graph shows emissions of N20 in Norway from 1985 to 1996 with projections to 2010. N20 can occour naturally or have anthropogenic sources such as fertilizrs, combustion and various industrial processes.
12 Feb 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sale of pesticide in Norway Sale of pesticide in Norway
Due to the high latitude and a relatively short growing season in Norway, the number of pests is limited compared with middle and southern Europe. However, some weed species are more dominant due to a general wet and cold climate. In 1985, 1,529 tonnes of pesticide active ingredients were sold. This was reduced to an average of 803 tonnes between 1991 and 1996.
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Norwegian emissions of CO2 Norwegian emissions of CO2
Emissions of carbon dioxide in Norway, 1985-1997, with projections up to 2010 (with a current measures scenario, as of 1997). Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is the main agent of greenhouse gases that is released primarily from the burning of fossil fuels, in cars, industry and homes.
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Emissions of SF6 in Norway, 85-96 Emissions of SF6 in Norway, 85-96
The graph shows emissions of SF6 in Norway from 1985 to 1996.SF6 is a highly potent greenhouse gas used in the industry for insulation in high voltage equipment and current interruption in electric transmission and distribution equipment.
12 Feb 2006 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Norwegian emissions of methane (1985-1996) Norwegian emissions of methane (1985-1996)
The graph shows Norwegian emissions of methane from 1985 to 1996. Methane is emitted to the atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Among these are fossil fuels, waste dumps, and livestock.
12 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, Emmanuelle Bournay, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Projected changes in Arctic pack ice (sea ice minimum extent) Projected changes in Arctic pack ice (sea ice minimum extent)
The averages of the scenarios in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) for the Arctic sea ice extent (the permanent ice) are presented in this map, with the successive decrease in the ice up to 2090. The projections are based on the models of the IPCC Third Assessment Report (IPCC TAR).
18 Dec 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Larsen ice shelf, Antarctic peninsula Larsen ice shelf, Antarctic peninsula
07 Oct 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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South America, southern ice fields South America, southern ice fields
In Southern South America there are primarily three ice fields with major glaciers - the Northern and Southern Patagonian Icefield in the Andes, and then Cordillera Darwin in the very south. All of these are very vulnerable to changes in the climate.
17 Mar 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in the ice-breaking date in the Tornio river, Finland Trends in the ice-breaking date in the Tornio river, Finland
The icebreaking date for the Tornio River in Finland has been recorded since 1693. With the increased greenhouse effect, impacts on the cryosphere are likely. One impact will be less ice on rivers and lakes. Freeze-up dates will be delayed, and break-up will begin earlier. The period of river-ice could be shortened by up to a month. Many rivers within the temperate regions could become ice-free or develop only intermittent or partial ice coverage...
14 Mar 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Arctic sea routes - Northern sea route and Northwest passage Arctic sea routes - Northern sea route and Northwest passage
Sea routes along the edges of the Arctic ocean, or rather along the coasts of Northern Canada and Russia, holds potential for decreasing the number of days in shipping goods from the Pacific to Atlantic coasts in Europe and North America, and vice versa. In addition, this could provide a means to transport natural resources, such as oil and gas, extracted in the Arctic. Currently these routes have not been possible to use this, due to the ice con...
13 Feb 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Malaria risk and climate change Malaria risk and climate change
Plasmodium vivax, with the Anopheles mosquito as a vector, is an organism causing malaria. The main climate factors that have bearing on the malarial transmission potential of the mosquito population are temperature and precipitation.
17 May 2005 - by UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Radiative forcing - energy balances and the greenhouse effect Radiative forcing - energy balances and the greenhouse effect
Radiative forcing is the change in the balance between radiation coming into the atmosphere and radiation going out. A positive radiative forcing tends on average to warm the surface of the Earth, and negative forcing tends on average to cool the surface. The figure shows estimates of the globally and annually averaged anthropogenic radiative forcing (in Wm-2) due to changes in concentrations of greenhouse gases and aerosols from pre-industrial t...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Change in permafrost temperature in Fairbanks (Alaska) Change in permafrost temperature in Fairbanks (Alaska)
With a doubling of atmospheric CO2, it is likely that there will be increases in the thickness of the active layer permafrost and the disappearance of most of the ice-rich discontinous permafrost over a century-long time span. This figure provides a good example of changes already observed in Alaska. Widespread loss of discontinous permafrost will trigger erosion or subsidence of ice-rich landscapes, change hydrologic processes, and release CO2 ...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Trends in global temperatures Trends in global temperatures
The figure shows the combined land-surface air and sea surface temperatures (degrees Centigrade) 1861 to 1998, relative to the average temperature between 1961 and 1990. The mean global surface temperature has increased by about 0.3 to 0.6°C since the late 19th century and by about 0.2 to 0.3°C over the last 40 years, which is the period with most reliable data. Recent years have been among the warmest since 1860 - the period for which instrumen...
06 Nov 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Temperature trends and projections Temperature trends and projections
Using the IS92 emission scenarios, projected global mean temperature changes relative to 1990 were calculated up to 2100. Climate models calculate that the global mean surface temperature could rise by about 1 to 4.5 centigrade by 2100. The topmost curve is for IS92e, assuming constant aerosol concentrations beyond 1990 and high climate sensitivity of 4.5 °C. The lowest curve is for IS92c and assumes constant aerosol concentrations beyond 1990 an...
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Scenarios of sea level rise, now - 2100 Scenarios of sea level rise, now - 2100
Using the IS92 emission scenarios, projected global mean sea level increases relative to 1990 were calculated up to 2100. Taking into account the ranges in the estimate of climate sensitivity and ice melt parameters, and the full set of IS92 emission scenarios, the models project an increase in global mean sea level of between 13 and 94 cm. During the fist half of the next century, the choice of emission scenario has relatively little effect on ...
01 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Sea level rise due, past and scenarios due to global warming Sea level rise due, past and scenarios due to global warming
Over the last 100 years, the global sea level has risen by about 10 to 25 cm. Sea level change is difficult to measure. Relative sea level changes have been derived mainly from tide-gauge data. In the conventional tide-gauge system, the sea level is measured relative to a land-based tide-gauge benchmark. The major problem is that the land experiences vertical movements (e.g. from isostatic effects, neotectonism, and sedimentation), and these get ...
01 Oct 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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CO2 emissions from industry CO2 emissions from industry
This map depicts the unequal distribution of industry in the world. The significant part of carbon dioxide emissions comes from energy production, industrial processes and transport. The industrialised countries consequently must bear the main responsibility of reducing emissions of carbon dioxide.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Main greenhouse gases Main greenhouse gases
The table lists some of the main greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide, methane, and freons) and their concentrations in pre-industrial times and in 1994; atmospheric lifetimes; anthropogenic sources; and Global Warming Potential. Greenhouse gases are a key factor in global warming, as they trap the radiating heat in the atmosphere, reflecting it back to the atmosphere.
17 May 2005 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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