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The bushmeat chain reaction The bushmeat chain reaction
The illicit bushmeat trade involves a series of underlying socio-economic factors, but leads, with rising population densities, to local depletions of wildlife species, and increasingly inside protected areas.
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Saiga antelope populations Saiga antelope populations
Saigas have been hunted since prehistoric times and today poaching remains the primary threat to this critically endangered species. Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, Saiga populations crashed by more than 95% within a decade. While a number of Saiga populations are starting to stabalize, three continue to be in a precarious state (North-West Pre-Caspian, Ural and Ustiturt populations).
19 Jun 2014 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, GRID Arendal
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Biodiversity in the Mediterranean Biodiversity in the Mediterranean
Species diversity in the Mediterranean Basin tends to increase from east to west with 43 % of known species occurring in the Eastern Mediterranean, 49 % in the Adriatic, and 87 % in the Western Mediterranean (UNEP/MAP 2012). The Western Mediterranean also has more endemic species than other regions of the sea. In addition, its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean and its seasonal frontal and upwelling systems provide nutrients. The Western Basin ...
19 Nov 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Area protected to maintain biodiversity in Malawi Area protected to maintain biodiversity in Malawi
This figure shows the ratio of area protected to maintain biological diversity. Malawi’s aquatic resources of over 1 000 fish species, which make up almost 15 per cent of global freshwater fish biodiversity, are under threat from water pollution and overfishing. Lake Malawi contains more unique fish species than any other lake in the world, and more than 90 per cent are endemic (CBD 2007), mainly from the family Cichlidae. The Shire River ba...
15 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Change in biodiversity for selected species in Angola Change in biodiversity for selected species in Angola
This figure shows the percentage changes in biodiversity of some species, illustrating the reduction in diversity of mammals and molluscs, while others are steady or increasing (eg, birds).
14 Oct 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Biodiversity in the Caspian Sea Biodiversity in the Caspian Sea
With the opening of the Volga-Don canal in 1952 navigation between the oceans and the Caspian became possible. Contact between the previously secluded Caspian marine ecosystem and the outside world was consequently inevitable. The connection led to the introduction of various alien species (plants and animals not native to the habitat). The most threatening event for the Caspian ecosystem was the arrival of the North American comb jelly (Mnem...
07 Mar 2012 - by Original cartography by Philippe Rekacewicz (le Monde Diplomatique) assisted by Laura Margueritte and Cecile Marin, later updated by Riccardo Pravettoni (GRID-Arendal), Novikov, Viktor (Zoi Environment Network)
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Loss of biodiversity with continued agricultural expansion, pollution, climate change and infrastructure development Loss of biodiversity with continued agricultural expansion, pollution, climate change and infrastructure development
Figure 27: Loss of biodiversity with continued agricultural expansion, pollution, climate change and infrastructure development. (Source: GLOBIO; Alkemade et al., 2009).
01 Feb 2009 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Impact of land conversion on biodiversity Impact of land conversion on biodiversity
The impacts of land conversion on biodiversity may be significant. The degree of impact relates to many factors, including where and how the bioenergy product is cultivated. This figure represent the short-term impacts of land conversion.
01 Mar 2012 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Biodiversity in forests and oil palm plantations, South East Asia Biodiversity in forests and oil palm plantations, South East Asia
01 Oct 2012 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Biofuels crops and biodiversity Biofuels crops and biodiversity
Biofuels pose several environmental and social risks. Therefore, to be truly a part of the green economy, biofuels need to comply with a set of safeguards along the entire production chain. Any bioenergy development strategy must integrate such safeguards at all levels, from policy to investments and the project itself. As impacts can be significant, they need to be assessed from a number of angles, including: • Direct and indirect lan...
08 Mar 2012 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Estimated costs and benefits of restoration projects in different biomes Estimated costs and benefits of restoration projects in different biomes
Biodiversity is the basis for any development; it is the natural capital, the stock of natural ecosystems, which provide services for any human activity. As pointed out above, the main immediate threat to biodiversity from biofuel production is through changes in land use, but longer-term threats may come from the spread of invasive species and uncontrolled use of genetically modified (GM) organisms. The environmental and social costs o...
01 Mar 2012 - by Riccardo Pravettoni, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Biodiveristy in Central Asia Biodiveristy in Central Asia
Caspian and Balkhash endemic species are under threat of extinction. It is estimated that ten percent of total area needs to be protected in order to sustain development and the countries of the region are seriously behind that benchmark.
14 Feb 2006 - by I. Atamuradova, V. Yemelin, P. Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Environmental trends Nordic countries 3 Environmental trends Nordic countries 3
This illustration shows positive and negative developments in areas such as household waste per capita, urban environment Quality, biodiversity and number of private and commercial cars, see the other illustrations in this collection for more information.
13 Feb 2006 - by Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Dobris+3: overall pan-european assessment Dobris+3: overall pan-european assessment
The graph shows Dobris+3: overall pan-european assessment. It describes positive or negative developments within various environmental branches, such as climate change, biodiversity and urban environment, the occurence of environmental policies as well as the principal drivers of said environmental developments.
13 Feb 2006 - by Emmanuelle Bournay, Philippe Rekacewicz, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact, Arctic Russia 2002 and scenarios Human impact, Arctic Russia 2002 and scenarios
Presentation of impact analysis from the Europe and Asia GLOBIO2 analysis and scenarios prepared for the GEO-3 publication. Much of Arctic Russia is very sparsely populated and will remain one of the World's few wilderness areas.
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius and Robert Barnes, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Preliminary assessment of the Amazonian region Preliminary assessment of the Amazonian region
Poster that was prepared as a proof of concept in the development of the GLOBIO2 model. The greater Amazonian region is a giant mega watershed with many remote areas with very little development and this area harbours a massive amount of water resources for the population in the densily inhabited areas downstream, as well as areas of very high and unique biodiversity.
26 Jan 2006 - by Maren Aschehoug, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact, Norway 2002-2050 (with protected areas) Human impact, Norway 2002-2050 (with protected areas)
Analysis of the suggested development of impact on ecosystems through human activities. The GLOBIO-2 model uses settlements and infrastructure, such as roads, pipelines and powerlines as proxies for stress and fragmentation.
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact, Greater Asian Mountains region 2000 and scenarios for 2030 Human impact, Greater Asian Mountains region 2000 and scenarios for 2030
Changes in the Greater Asian Mountains area with reduced biodiversity and ecosystem function as a result of human development in infrastructure and associated resource exploitation between 2000 and 2030, given different scenarios. Security first and Markest first indicate situations where market deiven forces determine rate and extent of development while policy first represents a moderate growth rate.
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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  The encroachment of road networks in Northern Norway, 1940-2000 The encroachment of road networks in Northern Norway, 1940-2000
The development of human settlements and the road network linking them together are fragmenting natural habitats especially for larger mammals, such as bears, wolves or reindeer. The nature loses its status as wilderness.
26 Jan 2006 - by Julien Rouaud, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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Human impact, Northern Norway 1600 and 2002-2052 Human impact, Northern Norway 1600 and 2002-2052
Analysis of the suggested development of impact on ecosystems through human activities. The GLOBIO-2 model uses settlements and infrastructure, such as roads, pipelines and powerlines as proxies for stress and fragmentation.
26 Jan 2006 - by Hugo Ahlenius, UNEP/GRID-Arendal
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