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Vital Graphics on Payment for Ecosystem Services - Realising Nature’s ValueVital Graphics on Payment for Ecosystem Services - Realising Nature’s Value
This publication highlights the concept and selected market segments relating to payments for ecosystem services. It emphasises the role natural capital can play in both environmental conservation and in poverty alleviation, and highlights the potential benefits of ecosystem-based economic development in an accessible, non-technical manner.
Available online at: http://www.grida.no/publications/vg/pes
Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda Trees for Global Benefits, Uganda
In Mitooma-Bushenyi in Uganda, the environmental conservation organisation Ecotrust has agreed with local landowners that in exchange for planting native species they will receive payments based on the amount of carbon their trees capture. After 15 years, those involved in the PES will be able to harvest the timber from the land. The carbon credits are delivered to Ecotrust, which then deals with the credit buyers.
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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GDP of the Poor: estimates for ecosystem-service dependence GDP of the Poor: estimates for ecosystem-service dependence
Poverty often occurs when links between ecosystem services and human well-being have been damaged or broken. Healthy ecosystems are ‘the wealth of the poor’. It has been estimated that ecosystem services and other non- marketed goods make up between 50 and 90 per cent of the total source of livelihoods among poor rural and forest-dwelling households – the so-called ‘GDP of the poor’ (TEEB 2010). This contrasts with various national GDP figures wh...
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Tmatboey - Cambodia Tmatboey - Cambodia
Cambodia’s deciduous forests are some of the most important conservation areas in southeast Asia, home to many mammals and water birds. Deforestation, hunting and the advance of settlers into forest areas have endangered the survival of threatened species in the region. In 2002, a series of pilot PES schemes, supported by the Government and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), were set up in protected areas. Under the community-based ecotouri...
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Market bundled Market bundled
For the most part PES schemes have tended to focus on a single ecosystem service, whether it is connected with the conservation of a watershed, the restoration of a forest or the preservation of a wildlife area for biodiversity or aesthetic purposes. A combined PES scheme may be able to join several services and provide sufficient, robust and sustainable economic and conservation opportunities.
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Simanjiro Conservation Easement, Tanzania Simanjiro Conservation Easement, Tanzania
Terrat is a village of some 3 500 people involved mainly in pastoral activities in northern Tanzania. In 2004, a group of five tourism operators entered into a PES type agreement with the community, with villagers helping conserve wildlife in exchange for annual financial payments. The Wildlife Conservation Society separately agreed to fund four village scouts to carry out wildlife monitoring and other activities.
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Market Landscape Market Landscape
Landscape beauty services are dependent on the preservation of nature and the beauty of intact and uninterrupted landscapes. Preserving nature’s bounty is not only important for traditional livelihoods but also to safeguard recreational, touristic, cultural and spiritual uses.
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Ecuador Ishpingo-Tambococha-Tiputini Yasaní Ecuador Ishpingo-Tambococha-Tiputini Yasaní
The Yasuní National Park in Ecuador is generally considered to be one of the richest biodiversity ‘hot spots’ in the world. It is also rich in natural resources, including oil. In 2007 Ecuador proposed a plan for a form of national scale PES, under which it would stop oil exploitation in the region if sufficient funds could be raised to compensate for lost oil revenues.
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Catskill-Delaware watershed: champagne drinking water for New York City Catskill-Delaware watershed: champagne drinking water for New York City
In the 1980s New York City was in need of new legislation on water management as water quality showed signs of deterioration. Rather than investing in new filtration plants, officials adopted a more progressive approach which would protect the water at source, by acquiring some upstate watershed land and protecting the surrounding forest.
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Watershed Market Watershed Market
A watershed is an area of land which feeds water into a river or a lake. A variety of ecosystems can make up a watershed, including various bodies of water, wetlands, grasslands, forests and cultivated areas. Watersheds provide a wide range of goods and services which support human welfare.
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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Scolel Té: growing up with trees Scolel Té: growing up with trees
The Scolel Té Plan Vivo project involves over 2,500 families and nearly 50 communities in the central and northern Chiapas and northeast Oaxaca areas of southern Mexico. It is a model for community-based, sustainable land use and sequestration projects in developing countries.
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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23 Ecosystem services 23 Ecosystem services
The concepts within ecosystem services are clustered in four main categories: provisioning services, regulatory services, cultural services, and supporting services. In addition to this, ecosystem services can also be categorized by the market segments under which they fall. This figure shows 23 of the most key ecosystem services and the different ways they can be categorized.
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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The 3 Capital fluxes The 3 Capital fluxes
Within the topic of payment for ecosystem services, it is important to consider the complexity of interactions between the three main capitals (natural capital, economic capital and social capital). Services and needs that lie within each of the three capitals rely on fluxes from the other two services; balancing these fluxes allows the system to both successfully and sustainably function.
17 Sep 2013 - by GRID-Arendal
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